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Prehistory Division

Mount Carmel Caves

Mount Carmel Caves

The long cultural sequence exposed in the four caves and rock-shelters that make up the Nahal Me'arot site, Tabun, Jamal, el-Wad and Skhul, extends from the Lower Palaeolithic to the present day, thus representing nearly a million years of human evolution. In addition to evidence for numerous palaeo-environmental fluctuations, there are also several well-preserved burials of two Middle Paleolithic human types (Neanderthals and Early Anatomically Modern Humans) and passage from nomadic hunter-gatherer groups to complex, sedentary agricultural societies is extensively documented at the site. Taken together, these emphasize the paramount significance of the Mount Carmel caves for the study of human cultural and biological evolution within the framework of palaeo-ecological changes. Nahal Mearot has been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO – June 2012.

Tel Tsaf

Tsaf_R.jpgThe Protohistoric site of Tel Tsaf, in the Jordan Valley, has long been thought as a promising site for studying pre-Ghassulian phenomena. Indeed with its extensive size of approximately 5 hectares, its deep stratigraphic sequence and its notable preservation of architecture, organic materials and other types of material culture, Tel Tsaf is one of the key sites for studying the Neolithic-Chalcolithic transition in the southern Levant. 
The excavations are directed by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of The Zinman Institute of Archaeology and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of the Eurasia Department of the German Archaeological Institute, Berlin.

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el-Wad Cave and Terrace

elwadThe cave of el-Wad is one of the sites found in Nahal Me'arot. The current excavations on the terrace fronting the cave concentrate on recovering data from the Natufian culture dating from ca. 15,000 BP to 11,500 BP. A primary objective is to reconstruct the spatial organization of one of the earliest known sedentary settlements. To date, we have recovered numerous flint tools, well preserved fauna, grinding tools, human burials and architectural remains. The excavations are directed by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Misliya Cave

MisliyaMisiiya is a collapsed prehistoric cave located not far from Haifa, on the western slopes of Mount Carmel, overlooking the Mediterranean. The expedition, headed by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. & This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Tel-Aviv University) aims at sourcing the origins of early modern humans, at a site never before excavated. The project is sponsored by the Dan David Foundation.

Giv'at Kipod

Givat_kipodA basalt hill on the eastern margins of the Menashe Hills, some 20 km south of the city of Haifa was discovered and tested during 2004-2004 by Prof. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  and  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Initial surveys and trial excavation at the hill prove to show that Giv'at Kipod (Hedgehog Hill in Hebrew) was a center for the production of basalt bifacial tools, mainly axes and adzes. The hill's surface is doted with concentration of production waste (reduction loci) yielding mainly waste material (flakes and fragments) as well as preforms and rejects of bifacial tools.

The Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa, 199 Aba-Hushi Avenue, Haifa, Israel 3498838
Tel: +972-4-8249392 | Fax: +972-4-8249876 | E-mail: arch@research.haifa.ac.il | Department of Archaeology
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